Lyndsay Hayhurst
LYNDSAY HAYHURST

Dr. Hayhurst is currently accepting MA/MSc and PhD applicants for the 2022/2023 year. Please find further information here, and email her directly at lhayhurs(at)yorku.ca if interested. Applications are due January 15th but are available now and can be submitted before then.

Students

Masters

Jessica Nachman

Jessica Nachman

Jessica (she/they) is a Master’s student at York University, studying under the supervision of Dr. Lyndsay Hayhurst. Her research interests include anti-racism, decolonial feminism, physical culture, and sport. Prior to their Master’s, Jessica completed their undergraduate degree of Kinesiology at the University of Toronto. During her studies, Jessica conducted a qualitative research study on Whiteness in post-secondary kinesiology programs in Canada. Currently, Jessica is working on the SSHRC Bicycles-for-Development grant, conducting participatory action research on anti-racism, gender-based violence prevention, and environmental justice using the bicycle. As part of the Sport for Reconciliation project, Jessica is combining theories of Refusal with Indigenous youth sport (non-)participation.

Julia Ferreira Gomes

Julia Ferreira Gomes

Julia is a second year MSc student in Kinesiology and Health Sciences, studying under advisor Dr. Lyndsay Hayhurst. Prior to her studies at York University, she completed her BSc in Honours Health Sciences with minors in Chemistry, Biology, and Psychology at Wilfrid Laurier University.

Her research interests include exploring the development and empowerment of marginalized groups, sport and physical activity as they relate to healthcare and social and economic marginalization, and how race, class, and gender impact patients’ clinical outcomes. Julia approaches critical issues in health by integrating social and biomedical perspectives and moving toward a cell-to-society approach to applied health research.

Tayler Sinclair

Tayler Sinclair

Tayler is a first year MA student in the Development Studies program at York University. Having completed numerous internships in the humanitarian and development space, Tayler has acquired solid experience working on various issues including gender equality, human trafficking, refugee resettlement, and sexual and reproductive health and rights.

She hopes to further expand her knowledge and expertise surrounding trauma- and violence-informed approaches, sexual and reproductive health rights and gender-based violence to advocate for social change and to meaningfully support those affected by these issues.

Graduated Students and Alumni

Kelvin Leung

Kelvin Leung

Kelvin received his MA in 2019. His research explored the roles of Sport for Development (SDP) stakeholders in Norway on SDP policy development, implementation and evaluation, in addition to the ways in which SDP programmes are taken up, resisted, and/or reshaped at the local level. He pursued a graduate exchange to the Norwegian School of Sport Sciences during his data collection. Kelvin has co-authored several publications, including in Sport Management Review; and presented his work at a number of international and national conferences, including the International Sociological Association. Overall, his studies are situated at the intersection of his passion for social justice and the sport of judo, and he aspires to continue to take part in the ongoing discussion of the inclusion of sport in the realm of international development.

Mitchell McSweeney

Mitch McSweeney

Mitchell McSweeney (he/him) did his PhD with Dr. Hayhurst from 2017-2021 and is currently a postdoctoral fellow at the University of British Columbia, supporting the SSHRC-funded study on ‘Wheels of Change’. His research has been funded and recognized in a number of ways: 1) recipient of the Barbara Brown Student Paper Award – the top honour for graduate students during the 2017 North American Society for the Sociology of Sport (NASSS) conference; 2) a North American Society of Sport Management Doctoral Research Grant Award; and 3) a Sport Management Association of Australia and New Zealand (SMAANZ) Best Conference Paper Award. His doctoral research was funded by: 1) a Joseph-Armand Bombardier Canada Graduate Scholarship Doctoral Award; 2) Ontario Graduate Scholarship; 3) Canada Graduate Scholarships – Michael Smith Foreign Study Supplement; 3) North American Society for Sport Management Doctoral Research Grant. His research interests examine social entrepreneurship, innovation, sport for development, and livelihoods, and he often utilizes postcolonial theory, institutional theory, and diaspora to critically investigate these areas. Specifically, his dissertation used a participatory action research approach to examine how refugees in Kampala, Uganda, engaged in entrepreneurial strategies to conduct institutional work that aimed to challenge poverty and gender inequalities.

Mitchell’s writing has been published in seventeen peer reviewed journals (thirteen of which he is the first or sole author), seven book chapters, and one forthcoming edited book, titled Social innovation, entrepreneurship, and sport for development and peace. Mitchell’s work appears in journals that range from sport management studies to sociology of sport journals, including: Journal of Sport Management, Sport Management Review, Managing Leisure and Sport, Sport in Society; International Journal of Sport Policy and Politics; Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health.

Emerald Bandoles

Emerald Bandoles

Emerald received her MA in Kinesiology and Health Studies at York University in 2021, working with Dr. Hayhurst. Her research interests explore the intersections of sport for development, community health and postcolonial feminism in the Philippines. Specifically, Emerald conducted participatory action research with a sport for development NGO in Siargao. Her MA research was supported by the David Wurfel Award through the York Centre for Asian Research.